• ARRL Satellite Bulletin

    From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Wed Sep 2 21:12:29 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS005
    ARLS005 First Element of ARISS Next-Generation Radio System
    Installed and Operating on ISS

    ZCZC AS05
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 005 ARLS005
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT September 2, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS005
    ARLS005 First Element of ARISS Next-Generation Radio System
    Installed and Operating on ISS

    The initial element of the Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station (ARISS) next-generation radio system has been installed
    onboard the ISS, and amateur radio operations using the new gear are
    now under way.

    The first element, dubbed the InterOperable Radio System (IORS), was
    installed in the ISS Columbus module. The IORS replaces the Ericsson
    radio system and packet module that were originally certified for
    spaceflight in mid-2000.

    "Finally! It's been a scramble the last few days with coordination
    over the weekend and yesterday with astronaut Chris Cassidy,
    KF5KDR," ARISS-US Delegate for ARRL Rosalie White, K1STO, said. "But
    the new ARISS radio system is now installed, set up, and
    functioning. What a long road we've traveled over the past 5 years!"

    Initial operation of the new radio system is in FM cross-band
    repeater mode using an uplink of 145.99 MHz (CTCSS 67 Hz) and a
    downlink of 437.800 MHz. System activation was first observed at
    01:02 UTC on September 2. Special operations will continue to be
    announced, ARISS said.

    The IORS was launched from Kennedy Space Center last March onboard
    the SpaceX CRS-20 resupply mission. It consists of a special,
    "space-modified" JVC-Kenwood D710GA transceiver, an ARISS-developed multi-voltage power supply, and interconnecting cables. The design, development, fabrication, testing, and launch of the first IORS was
    the culmination of a 5-year engineering effort by the ARISS hardware
    team of volunteers.

    ARISS says the system "will enable new, exciting capabilities for
    ham radio operators, students, and the general public." Capabilities
    include a higher-power radio, voice repeater, digital packet radio
    (APRS) capabilities, and a Kenwood VC-H1 slow-scan television (SSTV)
    system.

    A second IORS will undergo flight certification for later launch and installation in the Russian Service Module. The second system
    enables dual, simultaneous operations, such as voice repeater and
    APRS packet. It also provides on-orbit redundancy to ensure
    continuous operations in the event of an IORS component failure.

    "Next-gen development efforts continue," ARISS said. "For the IORS,
    parts are being procured and a total of 10 systems are being
    fabricated to support flight, additional flight spares, ground
    testing, and astronaut training." Follow-on next-generation radio
    system elements include L-band repeater uplink capability -
    currently in development - and a flight Raspberry-Pi, dubbed
    "ARISS-Pi," that is just in the design phase. The ARISS-Pi promises
    operations autonomy and enhanced SSTV operations, ARISS explained.

    ARISS this year marks 20 years of continuous amateur radio
    operations on the ISS.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Tue Sep 29 17:35:26 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS006
    ARLS006 Slow-Scan Television Transmissions from ISS Planned

    ZCZC AS06
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 006 ARLS006
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT September 29, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS006
    ARLS006 Slow-Scan Television Transmissions from ISS Planned

    A Moscow Aviation Institute MAI-75 slow-scan television (SSTV)
    experiment event is planned for Wednesday, September 30, from 1305
    UTC to 1845 UTC, and Thursday, October 1, from 1230 UTC to 1745 UTC.
    SSTV signals will be transmitted on 145.800 MHz, plus/minus Doppler
    shift.

    The expected mode will be PD 120, and the call sign will be RS0ISS.
    Received images of reasonable quality may be posted on the ARISS
    SSTV Gallery at, https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/ .
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Tue Sep 29 17:36:24 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS007
    ARLS007 Chinese Amateur Radio Satellite Launches Delayed

    ZCZC AS07
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 007 ARLS007
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT September 29, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS007
    ARLS007 Chinese Amateur Radio Satellite Launches Delayed

    CAMSAT says the CAS-7A launch has been postponed until next May, and
    CAS-5A until next June.

    "Because of COVID-19, many things have been delayed," CAMSAT's Alan
    Kung, BA1DU, told ARRL. He said an announcement would be made closer
    to the announced launches.

    CAMSAT said last spring that CAS-7A would launch in mid-September;
    the launch has been postponed multiple times since first announced.
    CAS-5A was predicted to launch in October. Both satellites will
    carry two transponders that include HF, in a configuration similar
    to that of the Russian RS satellites decades ago.

    CAS-7A will be placed into a sun-synchronous orbit with an
    inclination of 98 degrees at 500 kilometers above Earth. The
    transponders will have a bandwidth of 30 kHz. According to the IARU
    amateur satellite frequency coordination page, the HF/HF linear
    transponder will uplink on 15 meters - 21.245 to 21.275 MHz, and
    downlink on 10 meters - 29.435 to 29.465 MHz. A CW beacon will
    transmit on 29.425 MHz. The HF/UHF transponder will uplink at
    21.3125 to 21.3275 MHz, and downlink at 435.3575 to 435.3725 MHz. A
    CW beacon for that transponder will transmit on 435.430 MHz.

    The CAS-5A nanosatellite, with a 6U form factor, carries two HF
    transponders and two VHF/UHF transponders. While in orbit, it will
    deploy the tiny CAS-5B femtosatellite, which will weigh just 0.5
    kilogram.

    The array of CAS-5A linear transponders will include HF/HF, HF/UHF,
    and VHF/UHF with 30-kHz passbands (except 15 kHz for the HF/UHF
    transponder).

    CAS-5A will include CW telemetry beacons on HF and UHF. The HF CW
    beacon will be at 29.465 MHz, and a UHF telemetry beacon will be at
    435.57 MHz. Other beacons include the HF/HF transponder beacon at
    29.490 MHz; the HF/UHF transponder beacon at 435.505 MHz, and the
    VHF/UHF transponder beacon at 435.540 MHz.

    Telemetry will be transmitted at 435.650 MHz. The V/U linear
    transponder will uplink at 145.820 MHz; the V/U FM transponder will
    uplink at 145.925 MHz. Terrestrial stations will access the
    transponders at 21.385 - 21.415 MHz.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Tue Oct 6 08:50:18 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS008
    ARLS008 An ARISS Slow-Scan TV Event from the ISS is Scheduled

    ZCZC AS08
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 008 ARLS008
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT October 5, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS008

    ARLS008 An ARISS Slow-Scan TV Event from the ISS is Scheduled

    An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
    slow-scan television (SSTV) event from the ISS is set to begin on
    October 4 at 1400 UTC for setup and operation, continuing until
    October 8 at 1915 UTC. Dates and times are subject to change, due to
    ISS operational adjustments. Images will be downlinked at 145.800
    MHz +/- 3 kHz for Doppler shift. The expected SSTV mode is PD 120.

    The main theme of this collection of images will be satellites.
    Radio enthusiasts participating in the event can post and view
    images on the ARISS SSTV Gallery at, https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/ .

    After your image is posted, you can acquire a special award by
    visiting https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ and following directions for
    submitting a digital copy of your received image.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Wed Oct 14 17:06:37 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS009
    ARLS009 ARRL Comments in Orbital Debris Mitigation Proceeding

    ZCZC AS09
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 009 ARLS009
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT October 14, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS009
    ARLS009 ARRL Comments in Orbital Debris Mitigation Proceeding

    In comments to the FCC, ARRL targeted two specific areas of concern
    regarding a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM) in IB
    Docket 18-313 - mitigation of orbital debris in the new space age.

    In an earlier phase of the proceeding, ARRL filed comments and met
    with FCC staff to discuss the proposed rules. In comments filed on
    October 9, ARRL focused on the areas of indemnification and maneuverability/propulsion. Indemnification places the liability for
    any possible damage from a satellite on an individual or entity.
    ARRL reiterated its assertion that, as a practical matter, an
    indemnification requirement "would seriously impair the ability of
    amateur and university experimenters to launch and operate
    satellites under US auspices" due to the potential liability and
    high insurance cost.

    The FNPRM can be found online in PDF format at, https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-20-54A1.pdf .

    ARRL's comments cited a letter from University Small Satellite
    Researchers, submitted on behalf of 24 named professors last April,
    contending that the requirement "would effectively preclude a large
    proportion of academic SmallSat missions because public universities
    typically cannot legally enter into indemnification arrangements."

    ARRL argued that if the FCC does adopt an indemnification
    requirement, it should allow either the owner or the licensee of an
    amateur space station to provide indemnification. In the Amateur
    Satellite Service a licensee can only be an individual. An
    individual licensee is unlikely to accept liability for a satellite,
    but a satellite owner might. In its own comments, AMSAT similarly
    asked for language that would allow satellite owners as well as
    licensees to indemnify the US for the operation of an amateur radio
    satellite.

    The FCC proposal also would require that all space stations deployed
    in low-Earth orbits higher than 400 kilometers (about 250 miles) be
    able to maneuver with the use of some sort of onboard propulsion
    system. ARRL urged adoption of an exception for "a limited number of
    amateur and similar experimental satellites" that are below a
    specified size and mass and either standalone spacecraft or in a
    constellation of no more than four or five individual satellites.
    ARRL suggested a size limit of 36 x 24 x 12 centimeters and 12
    kilograms in mass.

    "This would accommodate the types of small satellites most often
    used for experimental purposes by radio amateurs," ARRL told the
    FCC. "Such satellites are small in number [and] have limited to no
    capacity to implement maneuverability using current technology due
    to their small size," yet provide valuable platforms for
    experimentation and student experience.

    Alternatively, ARRL asked the FCC to consider increasing the
    400-kilometer low-Earth orbit limit, since satellites placed into
    orbit from the ISS and from ISS service vehicles "often are in
    higher orbits but share the same characteristics as those that orbit
    below 400 kilometers." Doing so would help to preserve the
    educational and experimental benefit of such satellites, ARRL said,
    provided "such vehicles are shown to pose no risk to the
    International Space Station and will return to Earth within the
    specified time limit."

    In concluding its remarks, ARRL asked for "reasonable
    accommodation," given the public benefit of the Amateur Satellite
    Service, rather than lumping small experimenters and researchers
    with large corporate entities planning to launch thousands of
    satellites.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Wed Nov 4 17:10:52 2020

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS010
    ARLS010 Neutron-1 CubeSat Scheduled for Deployment on November 5;
    Other Sats Pending

    ZCZC AS10
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 010 ARLS010
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT November 4, 2020
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS010
    ARLS010 Neutron-1 CubeSat Scheduled for Deployment on November 5;
    Other Sats Pending

    The 3-U Neutron-1 CubeSat is scheduled for deployment from the
    International Space Station (ISS) on November 5 at 10:40 UTC. For
    the satellite's first month and during its commissioning phase, the
    Neutron-1 beacon will transmit 1,200 bps BPSK telemetry every 60
    seconds on 435.300 MHz. Developed by the Hawaii Space Flight
    Laboratory (HSFL) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), the
    satellite's payload includes a VU FM amateur radio repeater during
    available times and according to the spacecraft's power budget. The
    Neutron-1 science mission is spelled out in a formal paper,
    Neutron-1 Mission: Low Earth Orbit Neutron Flux Detection and COSMOS
    Mission Operations Technology Demonstration.

    More information can be found online at,
    https://www.hsfl.hawaii.edu/ .

    HSFL operates and maintains a satellite UHF, VHF, and L/S-band
    amateur radio ground station at Kauai Community College.

    The primary mission of Neutron-1 is to measure low-energy neutron
    flux in low-Earth orbit (LEO). The science payload, a small neutron
    detector developed by Arizona State University, will focus on
    measurements of low-energy secondary neutrons - a component of the
    LEO neutron environment.

    A number of other amateur radio satellites are expected to launch or
    be deployed in the next few months. AMSAT's RadFxSat-2 (Fox-1E) is
    expected to go into orbit by year's end on Virgin Orbit's
    LauncherOne vehicle. RadFxSat-2 carries a 30 kHz wide VU linear
    transponder.

    The Tevel Mission - a series of eight Israeli 1U CubeSats, each
    carrying a UV FM transponder - is expected to launch from India on a
    SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket in December. Also from the Herzliya Science
    Center is a 3U CubeSat called Tausat-1, which is scheduled to launch
    on a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) ISS resupply mission
    in February for subsequent deployment. Tausat-1 carries an FM
    transponder.

    AMSAT-Spain (AMSAT-EA) reports that its PocketQubes, EASAT-2, and
    HADES, have been integrated for launch on a SpaceX Falcon 9 in
    December, while GENESIS-L and GENESIS-N have been integrated for
    launch on Firefly's Alpha rocket.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Tue Jan 12 17:36:38 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS001
    ARLS001 AMSAT/Vanderbilt RadFXSat-2/Fox 1E Set to Launch

    ZCZC AS01
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 001 ARLS001
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT January 12, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS001
    ARLS001 AMSAT/Vanderbilt RadFXSat-2/Fox 1E Set to Launch

    Virgin Orbit's LauncherOne is a go for launch on Wednesday, January
    13, at 1500 UTC, carrying the AMSAT/Vanderbilt RadFXSat-2/Fox-1E
    CubeSat into space.

    The LauncherOne vehicle will carry 10 other satellites.
    RadFXSat-2/Fox-1E carries an inverting linear transponder, with
    uplink at 145.860 MHz - 145.890 MHz, and downlink at 435.760 MHz -
    435.790 MHz.

    Telemetry will downlink on 435.750 MHz. More information is on the
    Space Launch Now website at, https://spacelaunchnow.me/launch/launcherone-launch-demo-2/ .
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Fri Jan 29 11:24:40 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS002
    ARLS002 RadFxSat-2 Satellite Signals Detected, AMSAT Engineering
    Continues to Assess Status

    ZCZC AS02
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 002 ARLS002
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT January 29, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS002
    ARLS002 RadFxSat-2 Satellite Signals Detected, AMSAT Engineering
    Continues to Assess Status

    AMSAT reports that it's continuing to assess the status of the
    RadFxSat-2 / Fox-1E amateur radio CubeSat after a ham in Nevada
    reported hearing his CW signal weakly via the spacecraft's
    transponder on January 27. AMSAT Engineering and Operations was able
    to confirm the reports from Brad Schumacher, W5SAT, and determined
    that RadFxSat-2 is partially functioning, although signals are
    extremely weak.

    "We also appreciate those who joined in determining whether they
    could detect their own or other signals in recent passes today,"
    AMSAT said in a January 28 bulletin. "Please do not attempt to
    transmit through the transponder until further notice. This is very
    important to the next steps we are taking now."

    The next crucial step in evaluating the condition of RadFxSat-2 is
    to determine whether or not the 1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon is
    operating and, if possible, to copy telemetry from the beacon. AMSAT
    continues to ask that those with 70-centimeter receive capability
    listen on the beacon frequency of 435.750 MHz, +/- Doppler, upper
    sideband (USB). Use FoxTelem to capture any telemetry, and set
    FoxTelem to "Upload to Server" so that AMSAT will receive the
    telemetry data.

    Recordings are welcome, with a detailed description, at,
    foxtelem@amsat.us .

    FoxTelem can be found at, https://www.amsat.org/foxtelem-software-for-windows-mac-linux/ .

    AMSAT stressed that keeping the RadFxSat-2 / Fox-1E transponder
    clear "is essential to putting all power and attention to the beacon telemetry." Available data suggest that RadFxSat-2 is OBJECT M from
    the Virgin Orbit LauncherOne launch, NORAD ID 47320, international
    designation 21-002M.

    "We thank the amateur satellite community for their perseverance and
    assistance while the AMSAT Engineering and Operations teams work to
    understand and resolve the situation with RadFxSat-2," AMSAT said.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Tue Feb 16 14:54:16 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS003
    ARLS003 CAPE-3 CubeSat Launched

    ZCZC AS03
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 003 ARLS003
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT February 16, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS003
    ARLS003 CAPE-3 CubeSat Launched

    The University of Louisiana (UL) at Lafayette student-built CAPE-3
    satellite was launched on January 17. A 1-U CubeSat, CAPE-3 includes
    a "digipeater and experimental UHF adaptive radio." An AX-25
    telemetry downlink has been coordinated on 145.825 MHz and a 1k2 frequency-shift keying (FSK) downlink has been coordinated on
    435.325 MHz, "which may burst to 100 kHz bandwidth," according to
    the IARU Amateur Satellite Coordination page.

    CAPE-3 is the third cube satellite in the CAPE series. The primary
    educational mission is to allow grade-school classrooms to access
    the Smartphone CubeSat Classroom, and run interactive experiments
    through an experimental smartphone ground-station grid.

    The secondary mission is to perform scientific experiments involving
    radiation detection and take pictures of Earth.

    The solar-powered spacecraft, created by UL Lafayette's CAPE
    Satellite Team, was launched with nine other CubeSats as part of
    NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. A
    Virgin Orbit LauncherOne rocket attached beneath a wing of a
    customized Boeing 747 was dropped high above the Pacific Ocean. It
    climbed about 225 miles above Earth and then ejected the satellite.

    Information on the ElaNa program can be found in PDF format at, https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/ lsp_elana_20_fact_sheet.pdf
    .

    (above URL all on one line)

    The CAPE satellites are named for the university's Cajun Advanced
    Picosatellite Experiment program, designed to prepare students for
    careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)
    fields.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.11-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Wed Mar 17 14:16:13 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS004
    ARLS004 ARISS Ham Station in Columbus Module Is Once Again
    Operational

    ZCZC AS04
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 004 ARLS004
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT March 17, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS004
    ARLS004 ARISS Ham Station in Columbus Module Is Once Again
    Operational

    Some 6 weeks after going silent following a spacewalk that installed
    new antenna cabling, the Amateur Radio on the International Space
    Station (ARISS) ham station in the Columbus module is once again
    operational. The Columbus station, which typically uses the callsign
    NA1SS, is the primary ARISS amateur radio station used for school
    contacts and other activities. A January 27 spacewalk replaced a
    coax feed line installed 11 years ago with another built by the
    European Space Agency (ESA) and Airbus.

    While the specific cause of the problem has not yet been determined,
    a March 13 spacewalk that restored the antenna cabling to its
    original configuration provided the cure. The plan to return the
    ARISS cabling to its original configuration had been a "contingency
    task" for a March 5 spacewalk, but the astronauts ran out of time.
    The ARISS work was appended to the to-do list for astronauts Mike
    Hopkins, KF5LJG, and Victor Glover, KI5BKC, to complete a week
    later.

    "On behalf of the ARISS International Team, our heartfelt thanks to
    all who helped ARISS work through the cable anomaly investigation, troubleshooting, and ultimate repair," ARISS International Chair
    Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, said. Bauer praised NASA, the ESA, Airbus, and ARISS-Russia lead Sergey Samburov, RV3DR. While the Columbus ham
    station was off the air, ARISS school and group contacts were able
    to continue using the ham station in the ISS Service Module on the
    Russian side of the station.

    During the weekend spacewalk, Hopkins swapped out a cable for the
    Bartolomeo commercial payload-handling platform that had been
    installed in series with the ARISS VHF-UHF antenna feed line,
    returning the ARISS system to its pre-January 27 configuration.
    Hopkins raised a question concerning a sharp bend in the cable near
    a connector, but no further adjustments were possible.

    On March 14, ARISS was able to confirm the operation's success when
    Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) signals on 145.825 MHz were
    heard in California, Utah, and Idaho as the ISS passed overhead.
    ARISS team member Christy Hunter, KB6LTY, was able to digipeat
    through NA1SS during the pass. With additional confirmation from
    stations in South America and the Middle East, ARISS declared the
    radio system operational again.

    Work during the March 13 spacewalk also made Bartolomeo operational.
    "Yesterday was a great day for all!" Bauer exulted. "Ad astra!"
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.13-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Thu Jun 17 11:33:19 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS007
    ARLS007 Slow-Scan TV Event from International Space Station Set

    ZCZC AS07
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 007 ARLS007
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT June 17, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS007
    ARLS007 Slow-Scan TV Event from International Space Station Set

    A slow-scan television (SSTV) event from June 21 - 26 will focus on
    amateur radio on the Space Shuttle, the Mir space station, and the International Space Station, Amateur Radio on the International
    Space Station (ARISS) has announced. Transmissions will be on
    145.800 MHz FM using PD120 SSTV mode.

    "The ARISS team will be transmitting SSTV images continuously from
    June 21 until June 26," ARISS said in announcing the upcoming event.
    "The images will be related to some of the amateur radio activities
    that have occurred on the space shuttle, the Mir space station, and
    the International Space Station."

    Transmissions will start at or about 0940 UTC on Monday, June 21 and
    will end by 1830 UTC on Saturday, June 26. "Those that recently
    missed the opportunity during the limited period of MAI
    transmissions should have numerous chances over the 6-day period to
    capture many - if not all 12 - of the images."

    The ARISS SSTV blog - located at http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/ -
    will post the latest information. Signals should be receivable on a
    handheld with a quarter-wave whip antenna. Use 25 kHz channel
    spacing if available.

    Pass time predictions are available on the AMSAT website at, https://www.amsat.org/track/ .
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Mon Jun 21 20:39:46 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS008
    ARLS008 MIR-SAT1 CubeSat Expected to Deploy from the ISS on June 22

    ZCZC AS08
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 008 ARLS008
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT June 21, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS008
    ARLS008 MIR-SAT1 CubeSat Expected to Deploy from the ISS on June 22

    MIR-SAT1 (Mauritius Imagery and Radiotelecommunication Satellite 1),
    the first amateur radio CubeSat from the Indian Ocean island nation
    of Mauritius, is expected to be deployed from the International
    Space Station (ISS) on June 22.

    MIR-SAT1 will carry an amateur radio V/U digipeater (a downlink of
    436.925 MHz has been coordinated). MIR-SAT1 will collect images of
    the Republic of Mauritius and its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)
    using an onboard camera.

    The 1U nanosatellite was designed by a team of Mauritian engineers
    and radio amateurs and built by the Mauritius Research and
    Innovation Council (MRIC). MIR-SAT1 will be available to the amateur
    community when the satellite is not in use for other purposes.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (432:1/112)
  • From Daryl Stout@432:1/112 to All on Mon Aug 2 15:58:01 2021

    SB SPACE @ ARL $ARLS009
    ARLS009 SSTV Transmissions Scheduled from ISS

    ZCZC AS09
    QST de W1AW
    Space Bulletin 009 ARLS009
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington, CT August 2, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPACE ARL ARLS009
    ARLS009 SSTV Transmissions Scheduled from ISS

    Friday and Saturday, August 6 - 7, Russian cosmonauts onboard the
    International Space Station (ISS) will transmit slow-scan television
    (SSTV) images from the station on 145.800 MHz FM. They will use SSTV
    mode PD-120. The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation
    Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be sent via RS0ISS, the
    ham station in the Russian Zvezda (Service) module using a Kenwood
    TM-D710 transceiver.

    The announced schedule is August 6, 1050 - 1910 UTC and August 7,
    0950 - 1555 UTC. Dates and times are subject to change. For stations
    in the ISS footprint, the RS0ISS signal should be easy to copy on a
    handheld transceiver and a quarter-wave whip. Use 25-kHz channel
    spacing, if available. Free ISS software is available to download.

    Pass predictions are available from AMSAT via,
    https://www.amsat.org/track/ . Representative images from prior ISS
    SSTV events are available in the ARISS SSTV Gallery at, https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php .
    NNNN
    /EX
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