• ARRL Extra Bulletin

    From Daryl Stout@454:1/33 to All on Thu Sep 23 09:11:35 2021

    SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX012
    ARLX012 Radio Amateurs on Standby Following La Palma Volcanic
    Eruption

    ZCZC AX12
    QST de W1AW
    Special Bulletin 12 ARLX012
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington CT September 23, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPCL ARL ARLX012
    ARLX012 Radio Amateurs on Standby Following La Palma Volcanic
    Eruption

    The Cumbre Vieja volcano on La Palmas in Spain's Canary Islands
    erupted for the first time in 50 years on Sunday, September 19,
    following an increase in seismic activity over the previous 7 days.
    The lava flow triggered the evacuation of more than 6,000 people so
    far. Authorities have deployed all the resources of the Canary
    Islands Government as well as military support from the mainland to
    manage the situation.

    In order to facilitate communication into and out of the area,
    EMCOM-SPAIN has asked that the IARU Emergency Center of Activity
    Frequencies be kept clear in case the situation worsens: 3.760 MHz;
    7.110 MHz; 14.300 MHz, and 21.360 MHz.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (454:1/33)
  • From Daryl Stout@454:1/33 to All on Thu Sep 23 09:11:39 2021

    SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX013
    ARLX013 Clear Frequencies Requested for Possible Nicaragua
    Earthquake Traffic

    ZCZC AX13
    QST de W1AW
    Special Bulletin 13 ARLX013
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington CT September 23, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPCL ARL ARLX013
    ARLX013 Clear Frequencies Requested for Possible Nicaragua
    Earthquake Traffic

    IARU Region 2 Emergency Coordinator Carlos Alberto Santamaria
    Gonzalez, CO2JC, has requested that radio amateurs in Central
    America avoid 7098 and 7198 kHz in the wake of an earthquake at 0957
    UTC the morning of September 22 in Nicaragua.

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) said the offshore magnitude 6.5
    earthquake has also affected Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador,
    Guatemala, and Honduras. The earthquake was followed by another 4.0
    temblor and other aftershocks of less intensity, as confirmed by
    Juan de la Cruz Rodriguez Perez, YN1J, President and National
    Emergency Coordinator of the Club de Radio Experimentadores de
    Nicaragua (CREN).

    CREN is the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-society
    for Nicaragua.

    The earthquake occurred offshore in the North Pacific some 60 miles
    from Chinandega and approximately 52 miles southwest of the resort
    town of Jiquilillo, Nicaragua. The USGS said the quake occurred at a
    depth of approximately 20 miles.

    According to the Nicaraguan Institute for Territorial Studies, the
    event was related to the tectonic processes of the collision between
    the Cocos and Caribe tectonic plates.

    Emergency communicator Juan de la Cruz, YN1J, requested the
    frequency protection.

    No tsunami warning has been issued and there have been no immediate
    reports of damage.

    According to the USGS, "Little or no landsliding is expected, but
    some landslides could have occurred in highly susceptible areas."
    And, "The number of people living near areas that could have
    produced landslides in this earthquake is low, but landslide damage
    or fatalities are still possible in highly susceptible areas. This
    is not a direct estimate of landslide fatalities or losses."
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (454:1/33)
  • From Daryl Stout@454:1/33 to All on Fri Oct 1 09:11:26 2021

    SB SPCL @ ARL $ARLX014
    ARLX014 Past AMSAT President and Director, and Amateur Satellite
    Pioneer Tom Clark, K3IO (SK)

    ZCZC AX14
    QST de W1AW
    Special Bulletin 14 ARLX014
    From ARRL Headquarters
    Newington CT October 1, 2021
    To all radio amateurs

    SB SPCL ARL ARLX014
    ARLX014 Past AMSAT President and Director, and Amateur Satellite
    Pioneer Tom Clark, K3IO (SK)

    AMSAT-NA Past President and ham radio satellite and digital pioneer
    Tom Clark, K3IO (ex-W3IWI), of Columbia, Maryland, died on September
    28 after a short illness and hospital stay. An ARRL Life Member, he
    was 82. Clark's accomplishments are legendary, and he left a lasting
    footprint in the worlds of amateur radio satellites and digital
    techniques.

    "His long-time technical achievements, mentoring to others, and
    technical leadership will be missed by his many peers and friends
    the world over," said Bob McGwier, N4HY.

    To honor Clark, AMSAT has rebranded its upcoming annual gathering as
    the 2021 AMSAT Dr. Tom Clark, K3IO, Memorial Space Symposium and
    Annual General Meeting. It will take place on October 30 via Zoom.
    (AMSAT members may register to attend via AMSAT's Membership and
    Event portal at, https://launch.amsat.org/ .) The event will be
    livestreamed on AMSAT's YouTube channel.

    A founding member of Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAPR), Clark was a
    co-founder of the TAPR/AMSAT DSP Project, which led to
    software-defined radio (SDR). He was a leader in the development of
    the AX.25 packet radio protocol. Clark served as AMSAT's second
    President, from 1980 until 1987. He also served on the AMSAT and
    TAPR Boards.

    In concert with McGwier, Clark developed the first amateur Digital
    Signal Processing (DSP) hardware, including a number of modems. He
    developed the uplink receivers and the spacecraft LAN (local area
    network) architecture used on all the Microsats (AMSAT-OSCAR 16,
    Dove-OSCAR 17, WEBERSAT-OSCAR 18, LUSAT-OSCAR 19, Italy-OSCAR 26,
    AMRAD-OSCAR 27, and TMSAT-OSCAR 31). McGwier said it was Clark who
    convinced him in 1985 that the future lay in DSP.

    "We started the TAPR/AMSAT DSP [digital signal processing] project,
    and it was announced in 1987," McGwier recounted. "We showed in our
    efforts that small stations with small antennas could bounce signals
    off the moon, and, using the power of DSP, we could see the signals
    in our computer displays." This led to the software-defined
    transponder (SDX) for satellite work, including ARISSat and AMSAT's
    Phase 3E.

    Clark received a doctorate in astrogeophysics from the University of
    Colorado. He went on to serve as Chief of the Astronomy Branch at
    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and was a Senior Scientist at NASA
    Goddard Space Flight Center, where he was principal investigator for
    the Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) activity there.

    In 2005, Clark became the first non-Russian to be awarded a Gold
    Medal of the Russian Academy of Sciences for his contributions to
    the international VLBI network. He is a member of the 2001 class of
    CQ magazine's Amateur Radio Hall of Fame.

    In 2016, ARRL awarded Clark with its President's Award, to recognize
    his 60 years of advancing amateur radio technology. On that
    occasion, McGwier said, "There would be no AMSAT to inspire all of
    this work without Tom Clark. Tom...saved the organization and
    inspired all of us to look to the future and aim for the stars."

    Clark was a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the
    International Association of Geodesy.
    NNNN
    /EX
    --- SBBSecho 3.14-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - Little Rock, Arkansas (454:1/33)